Rivelin Valley


Hollins Bridge Mill

Hollins Bridge Mill and associated water management system are the remains of a water-powered site first used for grinding cutlery, then later also fenders and optical glass.

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ABOUT HOLLINS BRIDGE MILL


 
 
Dating from about 1724, Hollins Bridge Mill was amongst the earliest of the 20 water-powered mills built in the Rivelin Valley. It had had six grinding trows (or troughs, often rented out to individual grinders.)
 
According to local records, In 1794 Hague & Parkin, local steel refiners, employed nine men at the mill.
 
By 1814 the number of trows had increased to one fender trow, seven cutlers’ trows and an unknown number of glass trows, the latter being used by Chadburns, optical instrument makers, for the grinding of optical glass lenses for use in glasses and telescopes.
 
In 1860, the Wheel was sold to the Sheffield Waterworks Company.
 
By 1868 it had been converted to a corn mill.
 
And in 1909 the mill was recorded as being run by John Wilson, the owner of the Malin Bridge Corn Mill.
 
In 1936 the mill was noted as being “little used”.
 

What remains now?

Only traces of the buildings survive, but the weir, and remains of the tail goit (a small man-made channel for transporting water)can still be seen.
 
The area was landscaped in the 1950s and little now remains of this mill and its original mill dam. The long weir across the river just upstream of Hollins Bridge was built in the early 1900s when the course of the river was altered.
 
The large stone structure on the north bank beside the weir is probably the remains of the intake/shuttle for the wheel pit.
 
The remains of the tail goit can still be seen under Hollins Bridge, joining the river on the downstream side of the bridge via a channel separated from the river by a series of stone slabs, necessary to equalise the water levels in the tail goit and river to prevent water backing up the tail goit when river levels were high.

The site of Hollins Bridge Mill in the present day, right next to the water play area.

 

Credits

Rivelin Valley Conservation Group (RVCG) - https://rivelinvalley.org.uk
Sheffield City Council
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